Carson Calls For Deregulation For Modular And Manufactured Home Industries

Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson blamed rampant U.S. homelessness on “stacks and stacks of regulations” on technology for modular and tiny homes.

Speaking on Fox & Friends Tuesday morning, Carson and New York and New Jersey Regional HUD administrator Lynne Patton detailed their annual homeless assessment report. The two HUD administrators said 78,000 New Yorkers live on the streets. Carson said Americans should be asking why homelessness is a large problem in such a “sophisticated society,” before pointing to regulations against more technological affordable housing as one root cause.
Carson called for fewer restrictions in cities against tiny homes and modular homes, dwellings that are cheaper to construct and are far less costly to maintain in terms of energy.
Carson and Patton joined New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio Monday night as they walked the streets and interviewed homeless individuals about the reasons behind their circumstances. Carson called for fewer restrictions in cities against tiny homes and modular homes, dwellings that are cheaper to construct and are far less costly to maintain in terms of energy.
“The key thing we do is we ask ourselves, why is this a problem in our country?” asked the President Donald Trump-appointed HUD secretary. “You look at Japan, look at Tokyo, they have virtually no homelessness there. And what is the difference they don’t have stacks and stacks of regulations that keep you from being able to use technology. We have some very innovative people in our country who’ve come up with modular homes, tremendous advances in manufactured housing, tiny homes, there is a whole host of things that could be used.”

Patton said that of the 78,000 New Yorkers on the streets, about 20,000 are children, and more than 3,600 people are sleeping outside on any given night of the year. Carson noted that young people’s incomes aren’t high enough to live comfortably in cities like New York before touting the “exploding” economy.

“Think of yourself as a millennial or a young person, maybe coming out college and getting your first job for $50,000 a year – you can’t afford anything here, forget about it. But if you had those other alternatives, you’d be able to get into it, build some equity step-wise and move to something else that’s one of the things we have to do,” Carson continued.

The Republican HUD secretary and former neurosurgeon said additional government programs are not the answer to the homelessness problem.

Patton said that of the 78,000 New Yorkers on the streets, about 20,000 are children, and more than 3,600 people are sleeping outside on any given night of the year. Carson noted that young people’s incomes aren’t high enough to live comfortably in cities like New York before touting the “exploding” economy.

“Think of yourself as a millennial or a young person, maybe coming out college and getting your first job for $50,000 a year – you can’t afford anything here, forget about it. But if you had those other alternatives, you’d be able to get into it, build some equity step-wise and move to something else that’s one of the things we have to do,” Carson continued.

The Republican HUD secretary and former neurosurgeon said additional government programs are not the answer to the homelessness problem.

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HUD Seeking Comments To Streamline Affordable Housing By Jan. 31st, 2020

HUD is currently requesting comments on how to provide affordable housing, and streamlining and limiting regulatory barriers toward housing provision. Comments are due by January 31, 2020. See upper right corner.

Summary

Consistent with President Trump’s Executive Order 13878, “Establishing a White House Council on Eliminating Regulatory Barriers to Affordable Housing,” dated June 25, 2019, this document informs the public that HUD requests public comment on Federal, State, local, and Tribal laws, regulations, land use requirements, and administrative practices that artificially raise the costs of affordable housing development and contribute to shortages in housing supply.

Interested persons are invited to submit comments responsive to this request for information (RFI) to the Regulations Division, Office of General Counsel, Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th Street SW, Room 10276, Washington, DC 20410-0500. Communications must refer to the above docket number and title. There are two methods for submitting public comments. All submissions must refer to the above docket number and title.

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